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Tracking Clean Energy Progress

Assessing critical energy technologies for global clean energy transitions

TCEP
About

The IEA’s Net Zero Emissions by 2050 Scenario (NZE) is a pathway for the global energy sector to achieve net zero CO2 emissions by 2050, while also achieving universal energy access by 2030 and major improvements in air quality.

Tracking Clean Energy Progress (TCEP) assesses recent developments for 55 components of the energy system that are critical for clean energy transitions. Progress is assessed against the Net Zero by 2050 Scenario trajectory for 2030, and recommendations are provided on how they can get 'on track' with this pathway. The assessed components include technologies, infrastructure, sectors, subsectors and cross-cutting strategies.

Of the 55 components tracked, 2 are fully “On track” with the Net Zero by 2050 Scenario trajectory – electric vehicles and lighting. However, recent policy action and technology developments – record renewable electricity capacity additions, increasing momentum in hydrogen and carbon capture project announcements, to name just a few – indicate that momentum is accelerating on clean energy transitions.  

What's on track?

Energy System Overview

Electricity Sector

More efforts needed

Oil & Natural Gas Supply

Not on track

A rapid step-change in policy and industry action is needed to cut flaring and methane emissions in the oil and gas sector.

Oil and Natural Gas Supply reportcircle-arrow

Low-Emissions Fuel Supply

Not on track

Biofuels and hydrogen production and distribution must be rolled out rapidly to meet the growing demand of a decarbonising energy system.

Low-Emission Fuel Supply reportcircle-arrow

Transport

Not on track

The transport sector needs to undergo a major transformation, including vastly improving efficiency and shifts from oil to electricity and low-carbon fuels.

Transport reportcircle-arrow

Industry

Not on track

Industry processes that can't be easily electrified must cut emissions through material efficiency and innovative technologies like hydrogen and carbon capture.

Industry reportcircle-arrow

Buildings

Not on track

Unprecedented efficiency improvements are required in buildings, addressing growing demand from cooling, heating and powered devices.

Buildings reportcircle-arrow
Methodology

The IEA's Tracking Clean Energy Progress (TCEP) assesses recent developments for 55 components of the energy system that are critical for clean energy transitions. The components assessed include sectors, subsectors, technologies, infrastructure and cross-cutting strategies.

Progress is assessed against the Net Zero by 2050 Scenario trajectory for 2030. In the current edition, projections and estimates are based on research and modelling results derived from data and policy inputs gathered up to July 2022. Further updates will be available in the World Energy Outlook 2022, to be released in October 2022.

Each component is assigned one of the following ‘traffic light’ ratings:

  • On track (green): if recent trends continue, in 2030 this area will comfortably be in line with the Net Zero by 2050 Scenario
  • More efforts needed (yellow): recent trends are positive and generally in the right direction to being in line by 2030 with the Net Zero by 2050 Scenario trajectory. However, progress needs to be faster, as a continuation of recent trends without any acceleration would still fall short of the Net Zero by 2050 Scenario trajectory.
  • Not on track (red): recent trends are either in the wrong direction or substantially insufficient to get in line by 2030 with the Net Zero by 2050 Scenario trajectory. This does not exclude that there may be positive developments on certain aspects or in certain regions; however, a step-change in effort is needed at the global level.

The assessment includes consideration of multiple indicators, such as trends and developments related to CO2 emissions, energy consumption, activity, technology deployment, innovation, supporting infrastructure, policy, investment, international collaboration and private sector strategies. The assessment does not rely on a single particular quantitative indicator, but rather is an overall evaluation of the key factors that would contribute to Net Zero by 2050 Scenario alignment by 2030.